from a superlame

we grow, we grow, we grow.

Portland, OR

Anyone have recommendations of things to do, see, or eat in Portland? Never been but heading there soonish!

“There is a language older by far and deeper than words. It is the language of bodies, of body on body, wind on snow, rain on trees, wave on stone. It is the language of dream, gesture, symbol, memory. We have forgotten this language. We do not even remember that it exists.”

—   A Language Older Than Words, Derrick Jensen   (via ampliflyahhhh)

(Source: tinbanes, via shrinkrants)

#puertorico
#puertorico

Over & Over by Smallpools

We Own The Night (Sweekuh Remix) by The Wanted

#haim #rivieratheatre
#HAIM
Sea urchins!! #puertorico
Me and the sea urchinz. #puertorico
Sohn #bottomlounge
#SOHN STILL NOT SURE HOW TO PRONOUNCE YOUR NAME BUT YOU WERE FAB
daywalkerindisguise:

RAVIOLI RAVIOLI GIVE ME THE FORMIOLI

daywalkerindisguise:

RAVIOLI RAVIOLI GIVE ME THE FORMIOLI

(Source: matthejew, via thefemme-menace)

Psychiatric diagnosis is often presented as an objective statement of fact, but is, in essence, a clinical judgment based on observation and interpretation of behaviour and self-report, and thus subject to variation and bias.

[…]

diagnoses such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, personality disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorders and so on [are of] limited reliability and questionable validity.

“Does prioritizing concerns about risk, pain, human vulnerability, and the uncertainty of the future alter the critical project? What might the study of narratives about illness look like if the critic’s task were to create intellectual arenas for the gathering of ideas, and to address matters of concern with care and compassion? If narratives of illness challenge critics to combine a willingness to suspect with an eagerness to listen, how can we best respond to this challenge? How can we define critical practices that are grounded in everyday life, practices that are rigorous, compelling and, at the same time, socially engaged and thoughtfully empathic?”

—   Jurecic, Ann. Illness as Narrative. Pittsburgh : University of Pittsburgh Press, 2012. Print.  (via medhumans)

(via shrinkrants)