from a superlame

we grow, we grow, we grow.

me flirting:

wanna follow me on tumblr

veganvibez:

found the best twitter 

(via the-noble-almost-human-porpoise)

Waking up with a hangover

whatshouldwecallme:

“Perhaps it is true that we do not really exist until there is someone there to see us existing, we cannot properly speak until there is someone who can understand what we are saying in essence, we are not wholly alive until we are loved.”

—   Alain de Botton, On Love (via theintentionallife)

(Source: quotethat, via fuckyeahexistentialism)

light-blue-smurf:

People Art Gallery

Exciting Photo Illusions

(via ohreallyfool)

utnereader:

Coexistence in Berlin
The House of One will provide a space for prayer and dialogue between the world’s religions.

utnereader:

Coexistence in Berlin

The House of One will provide a space for prayer and dialogue between the world’s religions.

Listening in Narrative Therapy

When we meet people for the first time, we want to understand the meaning of their stories for them. This means turning our backs on “expert” filters: not listening for chief complaints; not “gathering” the pertinent-to-us-as-experts bits of diagnostic information interspersed in their…

dynastylnoire:

ask-gallows-callibrator:

brontesnightthorn:

This is so fucking cute and I reblog it every time I see it and I can’t get over it.

i hate it when people say you cant love someone over the internet its just so wrong 

AWWWWWWW

(Source: celadonlonghorn, via thefemme-menace)

pleasestopbeingsad:

requested by frufrou

pleasestopbeingsad:

requested by frufrou

(via tessaracked)

adagioformaves:

stilinsk1:

gininipanini:

lunchbox-philosopher:

xghoststreak:

sizvideos:

Watch it in video

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I thought watermelon just had too much rind and that was wrong until I saw the next gif 

I didn’t know that people are mangoes and kiwis any other way. Why the fuck would you do that?

STRAWberry

Saw this on facebook the other day and seriously fell in love. This is so freaking awesome and helps eliminate waste. Definitely trying these ways from now on.

I will eat fruit however the damn hell I choose to.

(via ohreallyfool)

this for days.

(Source: youtube.com)

shrinkrants:

Locating problems in the culture rather than in the “self.”

… many of the people who seek therapy believe that the problems in their lives are a reflection of their own identity or the identity of others. When this is the case, their efforts to resolve problems usually have the effect of exacerbating them instead. This leads people to even more solidly believe that the problems of their lives are a reflection of certain “truths” about their nature and their character, or about the nature and character of others—that these problems are internal to their self or the selves of others.
… Because the habit of thought that constructs these internal understandings of people’s lives is significantly a cultural phenomenon, many of the problems that people consult therapists about are cultural in nature. The history of this cultural phenomenon has been traced by a number of historians of thought, including Michel Foucault… .
Foucault traced the origin of these internal understandings of life and identity back to the mid-17th century in Western culture. He proposed that this was, in part, the outcome of developments in:
“Dividing practices" that separated, through the ascriptionorassignment of a spoiled identity, the homeless, poor, mad, and infirm from the general population
The objectification of people’s bodies through the location of, and classification of, disorders within these bodies
"Normalizing judgment" as a mechanism of social control that incites people to measure their own and each other’s actions and thoughts against norms about life and development that are constructed withing the professional disciplines
The development of these dividing practices, of this scientific classification, and of this mechanism of normalizing judgment fostered the objectification of people’s identity. In this objectification of identity, many of the problems that people encounter in life come to represent the “truth” of their identity. For example, in the context of the professional disciplines, it is not uncommon for therapists to refer to a person as “disordered” or “dysfunctional,” and in wider culture it is not uncommon for people to consider themselves or others “incompetent” or “inadequate” by nature.
Externalizing conversations in which the problem becomes the problem, not the person, can be considered counter-practices to those that objectify people’s identities. Externalizing conversations employ practices of objectification of the problem against cultural practices of objectification of people.

From Maps of Narrative Practice by Michael White. WW Norton, New York. (2007) pp. 25 & 26.

shrinkrants:

Locating problems in the culture rather than in the “self.”

… many of the people who seek therapy believe that the problems in their lives are a reflection of their own identity or the identity of others. When this is the case, their efforts to resolve problems usually have the effect of exacerbating them instead. This leads people to even more solidly believe that the problems of their lives are a reflection of certain “truths” about their nature and their character, or about the nature and character of others—that these problems are internal to their self or the selves of others.

… Because the habit of thought that constructs these internal understandings of people’s lives is significantly a cultural phenomenon, many of the problems that people consult therapists about are cultural in nature. The history of this cultural phenomenon has been traced by a number of historians of thought, including Michel Foucault… .

Foucault traced the origin of these internal understandings of life and identity back to the mid-17th century in Western culture. He proposed that this was, in part, the outcome of developments in:

  • Dividing practices" that separated, through the ascriptionorassignment of a spoiled identity, the homeless, poor, mad, and infirm from the general population
  • The objectification of people’s bodies through the location of, and classification of, disorders within these bodies
  • "Normalizing judgment" as a mechanism of social control that incites people to measure their own and each other’s actions and thoughts against norms about life and development that are constructed withing the professional disciplines

The development of these dividing practices, of this scientific classification, and of this mechanism of normalizing judgment fostered the objectification of people’s identity. In this objectification of identity, many of the problems that people encounter in life come to represent the “truth” of their identity. For example, in the context of the professional disciplines, it is not uncommon for therapists to refer to a person as “disordered” or “dysfunctional,” and in wider culture it is not uncommon for people to consider themselves or others “incompetent” or “inadequate” by nature.

Externalizing conversations in which the problem becomes the problem, not the person, can be considered counter-practices to those that objectify people’s identities. Externalizing conversations employ practices of objectification of the problem against cultural practices of objectification of people.

From Maps of Narrative Practice by Michael White. WW Norton, New York. (2007) pp. 25 & 26.

“If your community has no place for the difficult, maddening, awful, irritating, frustrating people within it, the weak ones, the troubled ones, the mentally ill, the physically ill, the demanding, the ones who always bring up the same dumb point, the ones who make you want to scream when they talk – if it has no place for the real, actual people in it, we are failing. Community is community – it is all the people who show up, all the people who are present, all the people who are simply there – the ones you like, the ones you don’t like and all the ones in between. If you find yourself casting them off because you are too busy saving the world, you have to be reminded what, exactly, it is you are saving.”